Posts Tagged "Panama"

Panama City, Panama

After spending the night at anchorage, we took a tender to the marina at Fuerte Amador on the outskirts of Panama City where we boarded a Hop on Hop off Bus to explore “the Dubai of Central America.” At the marina there were local dancers to greet us. We have either, been to or passed Panama City many times before and each time were amazed at the number of new skyscrapers that appear on the skyline. On our travels around, the bays were almost dry (low tide) due to the extreme tides that occur here. After a perfect day for exploring the city we were treated to a spectacular sunset...

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Panama Canal

On January 10, 2016, we entered the Panama Canal. Our transit started at the Gutun Locks, where we were guided through by the electric locomotives known as “Mules.” After rising 85 feet we sailed into Gutun Lake and past the Charges River dam and down the Charges River toward the Pacific Ocean. While we sailed in the canal, local vendors came on board to sell their handicrafts and the culinary department set up a Panamanian Market  of different foods. Sailing down the canal the water was particularly muddy due to the increased dredging in preparation of the new larger locks being...

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Panama Canal

On there morning of January 11, 2015, we entered the Panama Canal. In the morning we traveled through Gatun Locks and Gatun Lake. In the afternoon we traveled through the Culebra Cut, under the Freedom Bridge to the Pedro Miguel Locks. After passing through the Miraflores Locks  we entered the Pacific Ocean. The total transit lasted 10 hours. The activity in the canal was always bustling, from the work of the canal tugs positioning the cargo ships before they enter the locks to the Mules guiding the ships in the locks. Still there were tranquil moments when a bird would land as if there were...

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San Blas Islands, Panama

Our second stop on this voyage was the San Blas Islands, home of the Kuna Indians famous for their brightly colored Molas. The island that we visited was called Carti and was only reachable by tender. When we arrived on the island we found many Kuna Indian ladies set up along the 2 main streets selling their Molas and posing for pictures for one dollar. The buildings on this small island we constructed of either wooden planks or thatching and the main mode of transportation was by dugout canoe. Scattered throughout the village were solar panels and satellite dishes. It was an interesting...

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